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City Observer Newsletter 5 September 2019 05, September 2019

City Observer Newsletter 5 September 2019

Tuesday and Wednesday this week, Year 12 students in Queensland who are taking an OP course, intended for university entry, by and large, sat the final Queensland Core Skills Test (QCS Test).

The QCS Test has been the single centrally set education authorities examination for Year 12 students since its first year in 1992. It concludes in 2019 and it tests the forty nine Common Curriculum Elements, such as reading graphs, following instructions, writing, etc. These are the elements of the Queensland curriculum that are delivered in the normal course of a student’s high school education, and Mathematics to Year 10 level is essentially the knowledge requirement tested. Having knowledge, and having good general knowledge will help a student to perform these four rigorous examinations.

The four tests are 1. Writing Task (600 words in two hours on an unprepared theme around complex stimulus items); Multiple Choice Paper 1 (90 minutes of filling in the correct circle answer of four choices); Short Response (paragraph answers over two hours); and Multiple Choice paper 2 (90 minutes of filling in the correct circle answer of four choices).

In 2018, only 48 percent of Year 12 students sat for an OP course. This is one of the reasons the Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority has totally revised the tertiary entrance ranking system in Qld, with Year 12, 2020, having centrally devised examinations in each of their subjects, in Term 4 all over Queensland. This is a massive shift, and change of philosophy and approach for educators and for students.

The QCS test has been a brilliant set of examinations; and problems in the Queensland system are not derived from the QCS Test; but rather from the failure of the moderation system used by the state; and the ease of entry to university via multiple, non-OP pathways.

As I write this, I am thinking about our Year 12s about to sit the final QCS Test. I wish them well; and I hope they revel in this final examination set by Qld education authorities in this unique format.

Principal's acknowledgement 

Bailey McCormack (Year 1) participated in the MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Readathon and read 100 books during the month of August. He raised $557.52 which will go towards the Family Camps run by the MS Foundation. Well done Bailey!

Dr Dirk Wellham - Principal

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